Peculiarities of the relationship between Nepal and Pakistan in the XX – early in the XXI century

Keywords: Pakistan, Nepal, South Asian, SAARC, economic cooperation, political cooperation

Abstract

Pakistan and Nepal are South Asian states that are members of the South Asian Regional Cooperation Association. Pakistan is a heavily populated, militarized state with a nuclear arsenal. Nepal is a small country in the Himalayas that does not have a large arsenal of weapons. Both states were officially established in the mid-twentieth century. Conflicts on the border between Pakistan and India continue to erupt. Nepal, which is partially dependent on India, cannot always condemn its actions, if it wants to maintain good relations with Pakistan. Pakistan-Nepal’s relations have been volatile during the XX- at the beginning of the XXI century - from friendly relations to the breaking of diplomatic relations. However, Nepal is a strategically important territory for Pakistan. In spite of poor transport links, Pakistan prioritizes increasing trade and revitalizing relations with Nepal, as such developments will drive India out of this area, with the geopolitical map of the world undergoing change and India losing its dominant position. Both Pakistan and Nepal play an active role in SAARC, reflecting, in essence, their shared desire to promote peace and progress in South Asia.

The article describes the relationship between Pakistan and Nepal in the twentieth century. In the course of the work, the history of Nepal-Pakistan relations was investigated, the peculiarities of cooperation within the Association of Regional Cooperation of South Asia were explored, economic and cultural cooperation was studied. The specifics of Nepal-Pakistan relations are hardly revealed in the works of national scientists, which is relevant to this research.

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Abstract views: 50
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Published
2020-03-27
How to Cite
Habro, I., & Kabachek, Y. (2020). Peculiarities of the relationship between Nepal and Pakistan in the XX – early in the XXI century. Acta De Historia & Politica: Saeculum XXI, (01), 32-38. https://doi.org/10.26693/ahpsxxi2019.01.032
Section
Articles